David Agnew and John Allen
David Agnew and John Allen

St. Kitts & Nevis and Seneca College to benefit from agreement

By Admin Tuesday December 30 2014 in News
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The government of St. Kitts & Nevis and Seneca College have signed an agreement that will provide the islands’ citizens with the advanced tools and skills required to compete in the global economy.

 

Under the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by Seneca’s president, David Agnew, the college will provide technical training programs to students in the twin islands, training to the islands’ vocational teachers at Seneca and accept students who qualify for education in relevant Seneca programs.

 

Agnew said his institution is delighted to be entering into the agreement that will draw on Seneca’s expertise and provide quality education and career training to Kittitians and Nevisians.

 

“While St. Kitts & Nevis is blessed with post-secondary institutions, they may not have ones that necessarily have great practical value to the islands,” said Agnew. One of the things that is really in our sweet spot is those kinds of practical skills in construction, technology, tourism and trade that we have. Those are programs that are the heart and soul of countries’ infrastructure.

 

“St. Kitts & Nevis’ future is geared around high-end tourism which means you need high-end facilities and services for first-class infrastructure. We are happy that we can be helpful in that regard in helping to underpin the economic development strategy of the islands.”

 

John Allen, the islands’ long-serving honorary consul general, signed the agreement on behalf of Prime Minister Dr. Denzil Douglas at Seneca’s main campus last week.

 

He said the agreement emanated from discussions with Don Valley East Member of Parliament Joe Daniel and Canadian-born entrepreneur, John Zuliani, who owns the Royal St. Kitts hotel.

 

“It took a government and private sector partnership along with government agencies to make this happen,” said Allen. “This historic agreement reinforces our strong education system and it will help us to maintain that edge we have in the global community, particularly in economic and diversification areas. It means that we will now have access to additional educational facilities.”

 

Close to 4,000 international students – many from the Caribbean – attend Seneca College.

 

“We are experienced in international education,” said Agnew. “The kind of education that we offer, which is applied education, is something that students need to be successful in the modern world. Our form of education is really having a renaissance around the globe.”

 

RON FANFAIR

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