IDB grants US$35.5 million to Haiti

By Admin Wednesday June 26 2013 in Caribbean
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WASHINGTON, D.C.: The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has announced the approval of a US$35.5 million grant for a program to expand and improve drinking water service in Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti.

 

The grant will support the second phase of a program launched in 2010 with support from the IDB and the Spanish Fund for Cooperation in Water and Sanitation in Latin American and the Caribbean (FECASALC). At present, about 70 per cent of the three million people in the Port-au-Prince metropolitan region consume water provided by CTE-RMPP.

 

The program will be carried out by Haiti’s national water and sanitation agency, DINEPA and CTE-RMPP. Both agencies receive capacity building support from the IDB and FECASALC.

 

As part of the program, a team of executives from international water companies was hired to advise CTE-RMPP staff on how to improve the utility’s technical, financial and commercial operations. They also helped plan activities to repair damage caused by the 2010 earthquake and to respond to the cholera epidemic.

 

During the first phase of the program, CTE-RMPP has doubled the time during which it distributes water, from an average 13 hours to 26 hours a week. It has also increased the production of water and improved chlorination and bacteriological tests. The utility has also boosted billing and collection.

 

Goals for the second phase include the further reduction of losses caused by leaks, clandestine connections and unpaid bills and improving revenue in order to cover operational expenses. CTE-RMPP will also implement a master plan of investments to expand coverage and improve the quality of service.

 

The IDB and the Spanish government (through FECASALC) are Haiti’s leading donors for water and sanitation. At present they are financing projects totaling US$180 million to improve water services in Port-au-Prince, several mid-size cities and numerous rural communities.

 

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