Opinion

March 21 should be about more than slogans

By ed 18.03.2009

By MURPHY BROWNE

The Commission finds that the police deliberately opened fire on an unarmed crowd that had gathered peacefully at Sharpeville on 21 March 1960 to protest against the pass laws. The Commission finds further that the SAP (South African Police) failed to give the crowd an order to disperse before they began firing and that they continued to fire upon the fleeing crowd, resulting in hundreds of people being shot in the back. As a result of the excessive force used, 69 people were killed and more than 300 injured. The Commission finds further that the police failed to facilitate access to medical and/or other assistance to those who were wounded immediately after the march.

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Growing pains in the new multicultural Canada

By ed 13.03.2009

By PAT WATSON

A recent airing of the half-hour dramedy, “Da Kink in My Hair”, waded into the question of Canadian identity and offered up how Canadians are those people who say ‘sorry’ for every and no apparent reason, play hockey, end every sentence with ‘eh?’ and are interminably polite. (Have you heard? Canadians are so polite they even say thank you to the ATM after it dispenses the money.)

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Canadians will attempt to arrest, charge George W. Bush

By ed 13.03.2009

By NORMAN (OTIS) RICHMOND

The International Criminal Court (ICC) has indicted Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir for war crimes and crimes against humanity in Sudan’s Darfur region, the first time an arrest warrant has been issued for a sitting head of state.

The three-judge panel said it had insufficient grounds for charges of genocide. This has sparked an international debate in some circles. African, Arab and progressives nations say they fear the warrant issued against al-Bashir will bring even more conflict in Darfur – where up to 300,000 people have died since 2003 – and further destabilize Sudan.

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Illinois boasts impressive line of African-Americans

By ed 13.03.2009

By MURPHY BROWNE

Black American pioneer, Jean Baptiste Pointe Du Sable, was the first known settler to build a house and open a trading post in what is now known as Chicago. Du Sable was a most intriguing man. Born in Haiti, he was educated in Paris and later worked as a seaman for his father.

Fearful of being enslaved after being shipwrecked in New Orleans, he traveled north and settled in Eschikagou. There he married a Potawatami Indian and raised two children. During that time he became well known as a fur trapper. He also expanded his home and land into a major settlement that included a dairy, bake house, smokehouse, poultry house, workshop, stable, barn and mill.

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Poverty, not race the reason students fail

By ed 09.03.2009

By PAT WATSON

Any attempt to determine student achievement or lack of achievement by race should be viewed as specious. Media reports highlighting that particular aspect in the findings of a recently released study on Toronto elementary schools have again contributed to carrying this unfortunate perception forward. But, attention-grabbing headlines do sell papers, especially in these competitive times.

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Bloody Sunday – a day that shamed America

By ed 09.03.2009

By MURPHY BROWNE

Sunday, March 7, 1965 became known as “Bloody Sunday” because on that day a group of African-Americans (including children and the elderly) were viciously attacked by baton wielding White supremacist thugs, with the blessing of the Alabama state government.

Alabama state troopers, local police, the sheriff and sheriff’s deputies all descended like a pack of ravenous wolves on the group of unarmed marchers who were planning to walk 54 miles from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

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TDSB must act on report

By ed 09.03.2009

We’re not surprised at some of the findings in a report released by the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) last week which showed that race and poverty had a significant impact on the education of young children in the school system. Educators and education activists in our community have been saying this for years.

That is one of the main reasons that we at Share have been so uncompromising and unrelenting in our support of the Africentric alternative school. It’s not that we see this school as solving all the problems Black kids are facing, but it is a start. It is first, an acknowledgement by the TDSB that more need to be done for Black and other minority students and, second, a sign that they might possibly be willing and ready to make the effort.

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Check out new school

By ed 19.01.2009

During Black History Month, much attention is focused on the history and culture of Blacks in the Diaspora as a way of learning and sharing, connecting and re-connecting, educating and re-educating – especially our youth – in an effort to fill gaps in our knowledge of our rich and diverse history.

One of the reasons this is important is that, for most of us, information on the history, culture and accomplishments of Black people has been absent from the curriculum in our schools.
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