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Casualties increased as Canadians moved into Kandahar

By ed 14.05.2011

By DAVID J. BERCUSON

The struggle to unseat the Taliban from power in Afghanistan, and keep it from returning to power, is Canada’s longest war by far. On September 11, 2001 terrorists hijacked four U.S. passenger planes; they crashed two of them into the World Trade Center in New York City, destroying the center, and one into the Pentagon in Washington. The fourth plane crashed in a field in Pennsylvania when passengers tried to re-take the aircraft.

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McGuinty government increases support for newcomers

By ed 04.05.2011

Ontario will help more women in abusive relationships or who are at risk of abuse through an expanded public education campaign, targeting supports to newcomers.

The Neighbours, Friends and Families campaign will raise awareness about the abuse of women among new Canadians by providing culturally and linguistically sensitive training. The campaign, which is delivered in over 200 communities across Ontario, helps people recognize the signs of violence against women, and know what actions to take in response.

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Peacekeeping Turns into War in the Balkans

By ed 04.05.2011

By DAVID BERCUSON

On September 15 and 16, 1993 a battalion of the Canadian Army engaged in battle for the first time since the end of the Korean War 40 years earlier. The Canadian battalion – 2nd Battalion of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (2PPCLI) – was defending the approaches to Medak, a small town along the border between Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

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Canada’s army, navy, air force form a unified military

By ed 28.04.2011

By DAVID BERCUSON

Canada is the only country in the western world that has a single unified military instead of an army, navy and air force. This unified military, named the Canadian Armed Forces, came into existence on February 1, 1968 just as the separate Canadian Army, Royal Canadian Navy and Royal Canadian Air Force ceased to exist. The Canadian Armed Forces is now almost always referred to as the Canadian Forces or simply the CF.

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Canada and its role as a peacekeeping nation

By ed 21.04.2011

By DAVID J. BERCUSON

Canada was once one of the world’s most active countries in United Nations peacekeeping operations. In fact, Canadians took pride that their soldiers did not really fight wars from the late 1950s to the mid-1990s but instead put on United Nations blue helmets to help warring nations turn from the battlefield to the peace table.

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Canadians played important role in Korean war

By ed 13.04.2011

By DAVID J. BERCUSON

Most Canadians probably knew nothing of Korea in the late spring of 1950. The Second World War was five years in the past and the more than a million Canadians who had fought the war were getting married, having children and settling into civilian life.

Suddenly, on June 25, 1950, war broke out in Korea when the military forces of the Communist north attacked the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and drove the South Korean forces into headlong retreat.

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The First World War launched Canada towards full nationhood

By ed 23.03.2011

By DAVID J. BERCUSON

Canada was not even an independent nation when it fought its costliest war ever, the First World War which, for Canada, began on August 4, 1914. When the war ended on November 11, 1918, Canada’s soldiers – indeed Canada’s entire war effort – gained a vital step on the road to full nationhood.

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Difficult to define Canada’s foreign policy

By ed 16.03.2011

By NORMAN HILLMER

Canadian governments have been unsuccessful in describing their foreign policy. Prime ministers Pierre Trudeau, Jean Chrétien and Paul Martin each published glossy booklets outlining Canada’s role in the world. All were full of incoherent generalities and all were quickly forgotten.

Efforts to define foreign policy flounder because no big idea or central purpose shapes Canada’s role in global affairs. American presidents dispense grand visions to meet international crisis or opportunity, but not in Canada, where flexibility and adaptability are the goal of policies made in response to an always changing world.

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Lester B. Pearson improve Canada’s world image

By ed 09.03.2011

By NORMAN HILLMER

As Canada emerged from the shelter of the British Empire after the Second World War, its foreign policy wore the sunny smile of Lester B. Pearson. Pearson’s amiable nickname was Mike, his boyish looks and breezy personality conveying the enthusiasm and innovation of a country coming into its own in the world.

Canada’s tenacious post-1945 international engagement became forever linked to Mike Pearson, Canada’s Ambassador to the United States as the Second World War came to an end; deputy foreign minister and then foreign minister from 1946 to 1957; and prime minister (1963-1968) when the country celebrated its 100 birthday.

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Balance is crucial in Canada-U.S. relationship

By ed 02.03.2011

By J.L. GRANATSTEIN

Frank Underhill was a noted Canadian historian a half century ago, even if he is now almost forgotten. But he wrote one sentence that still rings true: “Canadians, he said, were the first anti-Americans, the ideal anti-Americans, the anti-Americans as they exist in the mind of God.”

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