Caribbean News in Brief – March 11-2010

MUSIC MUSEUM

Kingston, Jamaica: A music museum which will feature rare pieces from the nation’s music history will open next year.

Officials say some of the works to be included include an early album of the late reggae star Bob Marley.

Museum curator Herbie Miller says a cassette tape from reggae great Peter Tosh, singing a blues song with the Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, will also be featured.

The museum will be run by the government through the Institute of Jamaica, which overseas cultural affairs.

DEMONSTRATION

Cockburn Town, Turks and Caicos Islands: The two political parties in the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) staged a demonstration on Monday against direct British rule.

The TCI constitution was suspended last August after a commission of inquiry found evidence of corruption in the former government.

The Progressive National Party (PNP) and the People’s Democratic Movement say they are not happy with how the territory is being run by the British officials.

PNP leader Galmo Williams said a country should not be run by one individual, a reference to Governor Gordon Wetherell, who is in charge of the daily operations of the TCI.

ADDRESSING CONCERNS

Georgetown, Guyana: President Bharrat Jagdeo has been quelling concerns about apparent divisiveness in the governing Peoples Progressive Party (PPP) in choosing a presidential candidate.

Under the current constitution, Jagdeo is barred from contesting another election, having served two terms.

For the first time in its 60-year history, PPP executives are publicly announcing their interest in heading the party.

Four candidates who have already announced their intentions are House Speaker Ralph Ram Karran, the party’s General Secretary, Donald Ramotar, Home Affairs Minister Clement Rohee and government back-bencher Moses Nagamootoo.

RESIGNATION

Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago: The executive Chairman of Trinidad’s Urban Development Corporation (UDECOTT), Calder Hart, has resigned.

Hart has been at the centre of controversy during a commission of inquiry into the awarding of contracts by UDECOTT.

Last Friday, a high court judge ruled against a legal attempt by the corporation and Hart to prevent the commission from delivering its report to the president of the republic.

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