Academic excellence recognized with John Brooks awards

By RON FANFAIR

Rodrick Sutherland has big plans for the future. He intends to use the academic skills acquired in Canada to design St. Vincent & the Grenadines first university and also collaborate with the Caribbean island’s government to build accommodation for the homeless.

Sutherland came to Canada two years ago to join his father and pursue post-secondary education. He completed Grade 12 at Emery Collegiate Institute and is a first-year architectural technology student at Humber College.

“There is definitely a need back in St. Vincent & the Grenadines for individuals with the skills that I am learning in Canada,” said Sutherland, who was the recipient of a John Brooks scholarship presented last Saturday night. “The opportunities for development are huge and that’s where I see myself fitting in and making a valuable contribution in nation building.”

Sutherland said he felt fortunate to be nominated for the scholarship.

“This award is really important to me,” he said. “I live with my dad and sometimes it could be hard for him supporting us. I have two other siblings and my sister is eligible for university next year. I know it’s going to be tough so this scholarship will come in helpful in terms of buying books and covering tuition.”

Brooks, an Order of Canada recipient who passed away last year, established the John Brooks Community Foundation and Scholarship Fund (JBCFSF) 28 years ago. The organization has presented close to $150,000 in academic awards to nearly 825 students ranging from Grades Seven to 12.

A total of 23 students, including JBCFSF Top Graduate prize winner, Yannick Allwood, were honoured this year. The Cawthra Park Secondary School graduate, who is pursuing music and actuarial science studies at the University of Western Ontario, acted in the Broadway musical, Ragtime, and has secured academic awards from the Black Business and Professional Association and the United Achievers Club of Brampton in the past six weeks.

Allwood’s younger brother, Rashan, a Grade Nine student who aspires to be a lawyer, also won a John Brooks scholarship.

Other winners were Galen McMonagle, Mariba Douglas, Boyd Reid, Amit Sikder, Keith MacDougall, Zachary Slater, Augusta White, Monica Samuel, Ning Da, Bismark Boateng, Wilson Li, Modou Ka, Kiah Reid, Jaskaran Gill, Sibonokhule Mpala, Thundil Champion, Jordan Tenn-Yuk, Camille Walker, Corey Sherwood and Jayson Henry.

In 1992, Queen’s University became the first institution of higher learning to establish on-going relationships with the JBCFSF in the form of an annual scholarship awarded to eligible students entering an undergraduate program. Over the years, other educational institutions, private businesses and individuals have joined hands with the JBCFSF to promote and support academic and community excellence.

Janet Sri Skanda Rajah was presented with the JBCFSF Community Service award.

Jamaican-born Gerald Archambeau, the author of The Struggle to Walk With Dignity, was the keynote speaker. Raised in Kingston by his grandmother and two aunts, he migrated to Canada in January 1947 to join his mother and stepfather in Montreal. Thrown out of his home at age 15, Archambeau worked as a railway porter and in the airline industry before retiring in 1993.

He shared his experiences as a Black immigrant in Montreal and his courageous struggle to succeed in a new country despite myriad obstacles.

 

 

completed Grade 12 at Emery Collegiate Institute and is a first-year architectural technology student at Humber College.

“There is definitely a need back in St. Vincent & the Grenadines for individuals with the skills that I am learning in Canada,” said Sutherland, who was the recipient of a John Brooks scholarship presented last Saturday night. “The opportunities for development are huge and that’s where I see myself fitting in and making a valuable contribution in nation building.”

Sutherland said he felt fortunate to be nominated for the scholarship.

“This award is really important to me,” he said. “I live with my dad and sometimes it could be hard for him supporting us. I have two other siblings and my sister is eligible for university next year. I know it’s going to be tough so this scholarship will come in helpful in terms of buying books and covering tuition.”

Brooks, an Order of Canada recipient who passed away last year, established the John Brooks Community Foundation and Scholarship Fund (JBCFSF) 28 years ago. The organization has presented close to $150,000 in academic awards to nearly 825 students ranging from Grades Seven to 12.

A total of 23 students, including JBCFSF Top Graduate prize winner, Yannick Allwood, were honoured this year. The Cawthra Park Secondary School graduate, who is pursuing music and actuarial science studies at the University of Western Ontario, acted in the Broadway musical, Ragtime, and has secured academic awards from the Black Business and Professional Association and the United Achievers Club of Brampton in the past six weeks.

Allwood’s younger brother, Rashan, a Grade Nine student who aspires to be a lawyer, also won a John Brooks scholarship.

Other winners were Galen McMonagle, Mariba Douglas, Boyd Reid, Amit Sikder, Keith MacDougall, Zachary Slater, Augusta White, Monica Samuel, Ning Da, Bismark Boateng, Wilson Li, Modou Ka, Kiah Reid, Jaskaran Gill, Sibonokhule Mpala, Thundil Champion, Jordan Tenn-Yuk, Camille Walker, Corey Sherwood and Jayson Henry.

In 1992, Queen’s University became the first institution of higher learning to establish on-going relationships with the JBCFSF in the form of an annual scholarship awarded to eligible students entering an undergraduate program. Over the years, other educational institutions, private businesses and individuals have joined hands with the JBCFSF to promote and support academic and community excellence.

Janet Sri Skanda Rajah was presented with the JBCFSF Community Service award.

Jamaican-born Gerald Archambeau, the author of The Struggle to Walk With Dignity, was the keynote speaker. Raised in Kingston by his grandmother and two aunts, he migrated to Canada in January 1947 to join his mother and stepfather in Montreal. Thrown out of his home at age 15, Archambeau worked as a railway porter and in the airline industry before retiring in 1993.

He shared his experiences as a Black immigrant in Montreal and his courageous struggle to succeed in a new country despite myriad obstacles.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Columnists

Archives